Royal Air Maroc’s hidden gems

In the suburbs of Casablanca lies the remains of the former Anfa airport.  Once the primary airport for the Moroccan capital, the site has closed down and is being redeveloped to form a new economic centre.  Where the main runway used to be, a new tramway has appeared and was in the final stages of testing in late 2012.

Not all aviation-related activity has ceased at Anfa though.  The national carrier, Royal Air Maroc, has a training complex there as well as an engineering school.

Furthermore, a large hangar still remains and it is here that an unexpected gem or two can still be found languishing.

Perhaps the most interesting aircraft still extant is a Lockheed Constellation, registration CN-CCN.  Complete and in reasonably good condition, this machine is painted in full Royal Air Maroc colours and is a good example of the type given that it is stored outside and a number of decades old!

CN-CCN

Sat alongside the Constellation is a Boeing 727, CN-CCG again fully liveried in Royal Air Maroc colours.

CN-CCG

Under the wing of the 727 is CN-TUJ, a Stampe bi-plane however I am having a little bit of trouble finding out the history of this machine.

Stampe

There are also two 737-200s inside the RAM hangar, CN-RMI and CN-RMK.

RAM 737s

One of the 737s (CN-RMI) still bears some of the markings from when it was temporarily painted in Lufthansa colours to portray D-ABCE. It’s temporary guise was for use in a film recreating the 1977 hijack of a Lufthansa 737.

Unfortunately there was no sign of the Caravelles that used to also occupy this space.  I have heard that one of them was due to move to a museum but I have not heard any more on this since.

Its a small shame that this small collection of important aircraft in Royal Air Maroc’s past is not open to the public but its nice to see that they have survived given the loss of the airport itself. It remains to be clear though what the future holds for this rather unique collection.

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